That's how sustainable the EQC is.

The image shows the rear view of the EQC.

That's how sustainable the EQC is.

As part of its "Ambition 2039", Mercedes-Benz is pursuing the goal of offering a carbon-neutral new passenger car fleet by this date. A key step in this direction is the Mercedes-Benz 360° Environmental Check, which the EQC 400 4MATIC was the first vehicle from the product and technology brand EQ to pass. This is a comprehensive Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) in which the environmental effects are investigated in detail across the entire life cycle, so from raw material extraction through production and usage (over a mileage of 200,000 kilometres) through to recovery. Mercedes-Benz is the first vehicle manufacturer to carry out this environmental check, and has already been doing so on a regular basis since 2005. The procedure is based on the international ISO standard 14040 and the result is also externally verified by TÜV Süd in an elaborate process, thus creating maximum transparency.
In this respect, the EQC 400 4MATIC benefits from permanent local emission-free driving and the high efficiency of the electric powertrain. Electric vehicles can often offset the CO₂ emissions, which are often initially higher, in subsequent driving depending on the source of electricity. If electric vehicles are powered only by renewable energies, CO₂ emissions decrease by up to 70 percent over their life cycle compared with vehicles with combustion engines.

Our goal for 2022: carbon neutrality ex-factory.

The image shows a side view of the EQC.

Our goal for 2022: carbon neutrality ex-factory.

All other things being equal, the production of electric vehicles generates more CO₂ than the production of vehicles with internal combustion engines because a lot of energy is needed, especially for the battery cell production. It is therefore all the more important to procure carbon-neutral energy for production, which Mercedes-Benz is aiming for in all European plants as early as 2022. One step along this path is to use "green" electricity from domestic wind farms for the production of the EQC at the Mercedes-Benz plant in Bremen and for the battery production at the Deutsche ACCUMOTIVE site in Kamenz, Saxony, among other things.
In the use phase, drivers today can already directly influence the environmental balance of their electric vehicles - depending on the electricity they charge with. The LCA is in keeping with this, in particular the CO₂ balance in a concrete consideration of the entire life cycle of the Mercedes-Benz EQC with a mileage of 200,000 kilometres. By using clean electricity to charge the batteries, the EQC can cut its CO₂ footprint almost by half.

The material composition of the EQC.

The image shows the interior of the EQC.

The material composition of the EQC.

The kerb weight of the EQC 400 4MATIC is 2420 kilogrammes. Steel and ferrous materials account for the largest share (39 percent), followed by alloys (23 percent) and polymer materials, i.e. plastics (18 percent).

Already today, the use of resource-friendly materials such as recycled plastics and renewable raw materials in vehicles is being continuously expanded. For example, the high-quality seat fabric material "Response", which has been newly developed for the EQC, consists of 100 percent recycled PET bottles. In addition, recycled plastics are also used in the trim of the spare wheel well or the covers of the underside of the engine compartment. Renewable raw materials, such as kenaf, wool and paper are also used. The fibres of the kenaf plant are used, for example, in the load compartment panelling and paper as a paper honeycomb core in the loading floor.
In the EQC, a total of 100 components plus small parts such as push buttons, plastic nuts and cable fasteners with a total weight of 55.7 kilograms are made proportionately from resource-friendly materials.

Second life for high-voltage batteries.

The image shows the rear view of the EQC with a charging station in an urban environment.

Second life for high-voltage batteries.

Mercedes-Benz is actively involved in researching and developing new recycling technologies to secure the future raw material requirements for electric mobility. Knowledge on the recycling of lithium-ion batteries was already collected in various research projects and in collaboration with suppliers and disposal partners. The recycling of the raw materials used such as lithium, nickel, platinum, cobalt and rare earths is the focus of consideration and starts with the design of the component parts. Mercedes-Benz has defined four stages and corresponding processes for the battery recycling process: ReUse (long-term reuse of the battery, for example for stationary energy storage systems), RePair (repair work on the battery), ReManufacturing (dismantling and rebuilding of the battery) and ReMat (recycling and recovery of the contents).

Daimler has focused particularly on ReUse in the form of stationary energy storage systems by founding the wholly owned subsidiary Mercedes-Benz Energy GmbH: because the life cycle of a plug-in or electric vehicle battery does not have to end with the operation of the car, they can be reused for stationary battery storage systems. Slight capacity losses do not matter for this application, and so cost-effective use in stationary operation is thus possible for an estimated ten more years at least. Reusing the lithium-ion modules effectively doubles their economic value.

EQC 400 4MATIC: power consumption in kWh/100 km (combined): 21.5-20.1 ; CO2 emissions in g/km (combined): 0<p>The stated figures were obtained in accordance with the prescribed measuring process. Power consumption and range have been determined on the basis of Regulation (EC) No. 692/2008. Power consumption and range depend on the vehicle configuration.</p>